An Interview with Cheryl Holloway

I recently had a lovely interview with author and book blogger, Cheryl Holloway. You can read it here. Cheryl’s blog is her way to “pay it forward” on behalf of other authors. She says, “To Pay-It-Forward means that we must serve others in order to lift up ourselves,”  and she does just that.

It was great fun talking about all three books in the Clay Series. Book 3, The Clay Sustains, is due for release on September 29, 2017. Amazon pre-sales will begin on September 1.

In her interview, she asked which book was the hardest to write. My answer? It was the upcoming third book, The Clay Sustains, because I had to do a certain amount of world-building, since it was a prehistoric culture and society I was describing. Many of the spiritual and cultural beliefs of the characters were borrowed from the Pascua Yaqui Tribe’s ancestral people, the Yoeme, as well as from the Tohono O’odham Indians, who believe they are direct descendants of the Hohokam. I felt an obligation to treat these beliefs and practices with the utmost respect, while at the same time creating a society that readers should not assume to be factual representations of either culture or tribe. And, because Yoeme spirituality is somewhat complex, I had to work hard to make it accessible to my readers.

Striking a balance between creating a fictional world and honoring the real culture that serves, to some extent, as a model is something that I had to keep in mind with every word, sentence, paragraph, and chapter. I can only hope I succeeded.

She asked a wonderful series of thought-provoking questions that gave me an opportunity to explore my writing experience in depth.

Mosey on over to Cheryl’s blog and catch up with me and my author’s journey.

By the way, I will have a repeat interview with Pat Rullo on Speak Up Talk Radio on Tuesday, September 22. It’s a follow-up to last year’s interview in which I talked about writing the first two books in the Clay Series. Now I get to talk about book 3, The Clay Sustains.

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5 Questions Book Bloggers/Reviewers Should Answer on Their Websites

There is a lot to love about being an author, but there are a number of frustrations that have nothing to do with actually writing. It’s the marketing and promotion that get to me. Currently, on the top of my list is the challenge of finding reviewers or book bloggers from whom I can request a review.

Navigating book reviewer/blogger sites

I’ve spent hours going through website after website of reviewers from Amazon’s Top Reviewers using Amazon’s website as well as this site, which makes it a little easier to find and check the reviewer out. Or you can go to Twitter and do a search for “book reviewers” or “book bloggers,” adding your genre as part of the search terms. No matter where you go to find potential reviewers, you will follow the same procedure once you’ve found a website link for them. Continue reading “5 Questions Book Bloggers/Reviewers Should Answer on Their Websites”

“Solving” an Archaeological Mystery in Fiction

As I near the end of my current work-in-progress, The Clay Sustains, the third book of The Clay Series, I have arrived at the chapter wherein I will “solve” one of the greatest archaeological mysteries from the Hohokam era in the Tucson Basin.

In 1949, a man by the name of Ray Romo was hunting in an area of what is now Catalina State Park, near Tucson, Arizona. When the ground collapsed beneath his foot, I can only imagine he knelt down to examine the resulting hole and “peered into the past” (Swartz and Doelle, “The Romo Cache and Hohokam Life,” In the Mountain Shadows, 27:1, Archaeology Southwest, 1996 and 2013).

What he found was an ancient Hohokam pot cupped over a larger Hohokam pot containing a most exciting and intriguing treasure. Inside were 25 copper bells and 100,000 beads. That’s right. You read that correctly: 25 copper bells and 100,000 beads! romerocachediscoverysitebackgroundsstif

https://southwestphotojournal.com/category/prehistoric-pit-house-construction/

Continue reading ““Solving” an Archaeological Mystery in Fiction”

The Clay Series

One Pot…Three Women…Eight-Hundred Years

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The Clay Remembers:  Available at Amazon, B&NKobo, Smashwords, and Antigone Books and Mostly Books, Indie bookstores in Tucson, Arizona.

The Clay Endures: Available at Amazon, B&N, Kobo, Smashwords, and at Antigone Books and Mostly Books, Indie bookstores in Tucson, Arizona.

The Clay Sustains: Available July 30, 2017.