Interview on Book Marketing BuzzBlog

Sharon K. Miller fell in love with words at a young age, and writing became a big part of her life from that moment on. Her fascination with the archaeology and history of the Sonoran Desert and the Indigenous cultures who left their stories etched on and buried in the land inspired the books in the Clay Series—the interconnected tales of three women separated by centuries.

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Many thanks to Brian Feinblum for posting my interview on his blog. http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2017/11/interview-with-author-sharon-k-miller.html

Interview With Author Sharon K. Miller

The Clay Sustains [Book 3 in the Clay Series was published in September, 2017]

Clay Series Box Set.pngSharon K. Miller fell in love with words at a young age, and writing became a big part of her life from that moment on. Her fascination with the archaeology and history of the Sonoran Desert and the Indigenous cultures who left their stories etched on and buried in the land inspired the books in the Clay Series—the interconnected tales of three women separated by centuries. She lives beneath the back range of the Santa Catalina Mountains near Tucson, Arizona. See: http://www.sharonkmiller.com

  1. What really inspired you to write your books, to force you from taking an idea or experience and conveying it into a series? There is a state park not far from where I live near Tucson, Arizona, and in the park is an interpretive trail that winds through the ruins of a prehistoric Hohokam village which was inhabited from approximately 200 BC to about 1450 AD. At the same site are the remains of a nineteenth-century homesteader’s house. Signs along the trail describe how the Hohokam lived and farmed the area and how Francisco Romero brought his wife there in the nineteenth century to establish a cattle ranch. The first time I walked this trail, I wondered about Victoriana Romero’s life in this lonely place where Apaches stole their cattle and did battle with her husband, threatening their very existence. My first inclination was to write her story, but I discovered there was very little in the historical record about her. I decided instead to write about a fictitious woman, Esperanza Ramirez, who finds an ancient pot and makes a connection to the Hohokam woman who made it—a connection that helps her deal with loneliness and threats from those who would do her harm.

For the rest of the interview, go to http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com/2017/11/interview-with-author-sharon-k-miller.html

5 Questions Book Bloggers/Reviewers Should Answer on Their Websites

There is a lot to love about being an author, but there are a number of frustrations that have nothing to do with actually writing. It’s the marketing and promotion that get to me. Currently, on the top of my list is the challenge of finding reviewers or book bloggers from whom I can request a review.

Navigating book reviewer/blogger sites

I’ve spent hours going through website after website of reviewers from Amazon’s Top Reviewers using Amazon’s website as well as this site, which makes it a little easier to find and check the reviewer out. Or you can go to Twitter and do a search for “book reviewers” or “book bloggers,” adding your genre as part of the search terms. No matter where you go to find potential reviewers, you will follow the same procedure once you’ve found a website link for them. Continue reading “5 Questions Book Bloggers/Reviewers Should Answer on Their Websites”

“Solving” an Archaeological Mystery in Fiction

As I near the end of my current work-in-progress, The Clay Sustains, the third book of The Clay Series, I have arrived at the chapter wherein I will “solve” one of the greatest archaeological mysteries from the Hohokam era in the Tucson Basin.

In 1949, a man by the name of Ray Romo was hunting in an area of what is now Catalina State Park, near Tucson, Arizona. When the ground collapsed beneath his foot, I can only imagine he knelt down to examine the resulting hole and “peered into the past” (Swartz and Doelle, “The Romo Cache and Hohokam Life,” In the Mountain Shadows, 27:1, Archaeology Southwest, 1996 and 2013).

What he found was an ancient Hohokam pot cupped over a larger Hohokam pot containing a most exciting and intriguing treasure. Inside were 25 copper bells and 100,000 beads. That’s right. You read that correctly: 25 copper bells and 100,000 beads! romerocachediscoverysitebackgroundsstif

https://southwestphotojournal.com/category/prehistoric-pit-house-construction/

Continue reading ““Solving” an Archaeological Mystery in Fiction”